RoyaltyStat Blog

Controversy Aside, IKEA on Solid Economic Footing in Royalty Dispute

Posted by Harold McClure

European affiliates of multinationals such as IKEA face scrutiny from a variety of agencies including the European Union (EU), which issued EU Council Directive 2011/16 also known as DAC6. The stated purpose of DAC6, which became effective on June 25, 2018, is to provide transparency and fairness in taxation. DAC6 applies to cross-border tax arrangements between EU affiliates and tax havens. One of these cross-border tax arrangements is intercompany royalty payments from EU affiliates to affiliate in tax havens such as Liechtenstein. Such intercompany payments by European affiliates of IKEA are being challenged by the European Commission in a State Aid inquiry, which was initiated on December 18, 2017, according to an EC press release:

Creating Defensible Transfer Pricing Reports

Posted by Ednaldo Silva

“We shall renounce . . . the subterfuges.”

Translating Credit Ratings into Credit Spreads in Intercompany Financing

Posted by Harold McClure

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) released its Transfer Pricing Guidance on Financial Transactions on February 11, 2020 just before the COVID-19 crisis mushroomed. Some commentators have noted that U.S. affiliates may have to rely on intercompany financing from their foreign parents just as tax authorities and multinationals are reviewing what this new guidance implies in terms of the pricing of intercompany loans.

Return on Assets When Assets are Exogenous

Posted by Ednaldo Silva

We suggested on prior blogs that operating assets (measured by property, plant & equipment) are endogenous and that structural equation estimates of return on assets produce biased coefficients. Here, we provide another alternative from biased estimates of return on assets than using exotic algorithms like two-stage least squares.

The Standard Measure of Return on Assets is Biased

Posted by Ednaldo Silva

Economic models must have mathematical beauty; they must be parsimonious!

Paraphrasing Paul Dirac (1955), Physical laws should have mathematical beauty, quoted in Abraham País, Maurice Jacob, David Olive, Michael Atiyah, Paul Dirac (The Man and his Work), Cambridge University Press, 1998, p. 46.

Safe Harbors for U.S. Retailers

Posted by Ednaldo Silva

Después de tanto soportar la pena de sentir tu olvido … y si pretendes remover las ruinas que tú mismo hiciste

Cenizas in the poignant voice of Toña La Negra. Classic bolero lyrics by Wello Rivas (1913-1990).

Transfer Prices Based on EBITDA, not EBIT

Posted by Ednaldo Silva

In applying the comparable profits method (CPM) in the U.S. or the “transactional” net margin method (TNMM) in other OECD countries, many transfer pricing analysts assume that the depreciation rate of property, plant, and equipment is the same among the individual comparables and the tested party.

Transfer Pricing Methods Based on Operating Profits

Posted by Ednaldo Silva

L’un fece il mundo e l’altro l’ha distrutto.

(Unattributed quote in Meditaciones del Quijote (1914), by José Ortega y Gasset)

The “Return on Assets” Excludes Self-Developed Intangibles

Posted by Ednaldo Silva

The “return on assets” is an unsatisfactory profit level indicator (PLI) for the “transactional” net margin and comparable profits methods in transfer pricing because (among other major defects) self-developed intangibles are excluded from the assets base denominator. Assets are also composed of heterogeneous balance sheet accounts with different depreciation rates.

Operating assets are “solid, massy, hard” and cannot be moved from one company to another within the same industry (horizontal market consolidation) or across companies in different industries (vertical market consolidation), without a time-consuming assets purchase agreement. Moreover, if the intra-company assets transfers are large, anti-trust regulatory impediments may occur.

The idea that “return on assets” is a superior PLI because of its fluent or gravitation properties is not consistent with reality. This dubious return on assets sobriquet is posited as a matter of faith because to our knowledge economics is devoid of rigorous demonstrations of the conditions required for such gravitation to occur in actual industries dominated by oligopoly groups.

Effect of Text Redaction on Royalty Rates and Other Licensing Terms

Posted by Alan Kwan

Any participant in the process of commercializing technology knows that secrecy is important for many reasons. First, if one discloses a valuable technology or trade secret, this may invite competitors wanting to ape that technology. Second, even if the technology is protectable, confidentiality about transaction terms may protect counterparties in future negotiations. Third, secrecy may just be safest when there is risk that audiences may misinterpret that information. When commercializing innovation, what is most frequently kept secret?